The Life (and Death) of Voicemail

Nearly 50 years ago, Gordan Mathews gave the world something that it’s never seen before: a machine that saved a voice message left by a caller.

At the time, it was revolutionary. After all, being able to give a voice recording to a caller, who could then leave a message for the receiver, was completely unheard of, not to mention practical for the everyday and business folk alike. Within the next two decades, voicemail would become completely integrated into society, forever changing how people communicated.

However, as time went on and technology grew more and more advanced, the once sophisticated concept only became more and more outdated.

Voicemail just doesn’t fit with our new fast-paced, constantly changing society. Now a days, we need information now, not inside 60 seconds, which is the average length of a voicemail. So what do we do? How do we move on from voicemail and into the future?

The answer is simple, we move on with Nexiwave, a voicemail-to-text transcription service. With Nexiwave, it’s no longer necessary to wait for an agonizing 60 seconds to hear the message of a caller, instead, you can get all of the information from one glance at your screen, all straight from your email.

It’s a straight forward process: Nexiwave’s service will take your voicemail, and by using a 99% accurate, completely automated system, your voicemail will get transcribed into text within mere minutes before being sent to your email inbox. It’s convenient, fast, and a real game-changer for businesses and commoners alike.

So, yes, while it is sad to see a once groundbreaking piece of technology become irrelevant, nobody can live in the shadows of the past forever. The world will continue to move on, and Nexiwave is here to help lead you and your voicemails do so.

Sign up for Nexiwave today!

Sources used:

http://www.everyvoicemail.com/vm-history.htm

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